Porsche Cayenne Sets World Record. Wait Till You See Why!

We seen powerlifters towing trucks and even aeroplanes before and a while back, a Toyota Tundra impressed the public when it towed the Space Shuttle Endeavor.

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While that appeared spectacular at the time, it is nothing compared to the latest feat by Porsche. They recently towed Airbus A380 over 42 meters with a stock standard Porsche Cayenne. To put the Toyota stunt into perspective, the Endeavor weighs a mere 155,000 pounds where as the Airbus A380, the largest passenger aircraft in the world, weighs in at a massive 630,000 pounds (285 metric tonnes or 314 U.S. tons). That is quite significantly heavier I would say.

Porsche made use of a Cayenne Diesel S which employed around 630 pound-feet of torque to achieve this impressive record. It all went down at the Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris and the Airbus was towed out of the Air France hanger. Driving the vehicle was Porsche Great Britain technician Richard Payne. There is a bit of controversy surrounding the diesel version of the Cayenne due to them using similar software to holding company Volkswagen to manipulate emission tests.

Porsche are buying back the Cayenne’s in question or modifying them to make their emissions compliant with regulations. So, just to be 100 percent legit, and impress us even more, Porsche went on to repeat the exercise with a Turbo S which performed just as well. The Turbo S is a high-performance model with a 4.8-liter twin-turbo petrol V8. Because the Diesel S did it first, that was the vehicle that made it into the Guinness Record books.

The vehicles used were completely standard; they simply used a modified tow assembly to attach the rear hitched to the Airbus. Payne simple gave it a bit of gas and got the mammoth aircraft moving. All non-hybrid Porsche Cayennes are certified to tow a maximum of 7,716 pounds. That obviously refers to towing over a long distance, not just 42 meters. That takes nothing away from this spectacular achievement that has to be seen to be believed.